Программируем pic с помощью arduino

rweather/ardpicprog

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README.md

Arduino-based PIC programmer

This distribution contains an Arduino-based solution for programming PIC microcontrollers from Microchip Technology Inc, such as the PIC16F628A and friends. The solution has three parts:

  • Circuit that is built on one or more prototyping shields to interface to the PIC and provide the 13V programming voltage.
  • Sketch called ProgramPIC that is loaded into an Arduino to directly interface with the PIC during programming. The sketch implements a simple serial protocol for interfacing with the host.
  • Host program called ardpicprog; a drop-in replacement for picprog that implements the serial protocol and controls the PIC programming process on the computer side.

See the documentation for more information on the project.

The sources for Plang are available from the project git repository. Then read the installation instructions.

For more information on Ardpicprog, to report bugs, or to suggest improvements, please contact the author Rhys Weatherley via email. Patches to support new device types are very welcome.

About

Arduino-based solution for programming PIC microcontrollers.

Источник

Creating a Serial PIC Programmer from an Arduino (Part 1)

A while back I bought a couple of PIC16F57 (DIP) chips because they were dirt cheap. I figured someday I could use these in something. Yes, I know, this is a horrible way to actually build something and a great way to accumulate junk. However, this time the bet paid off! Only about a year or two too late; but that’s beside the point. The problem I now had was that I didn’t have a PIC programmer.

When I bought these chips I figured I could easily rig a board up to the chip via USB. Lo and behold, I didn’t read the docs properly; this chipset doesn’t have a USB to serial interface. Instead, it only supports Microchip’s In-Circuit Serial Programming (ICSP) protocol via direct serial communication. Rather than spend the $40 to buy a PIC programmer (thus, accumulating even more junk I don’t need), I decided to think about how I could make this happen.

Glancing at some of my extra devices lying around, I noticed an unused Arduino. This is how the idea for this project came to life. Believe me, the irony of programming a PIC chip with an ATMega is not lost on me. So for all of you asking, «why would anyone do this?» the answer is two-fold. First, I didn’t want to accumulate even more electronics I would not use often. Second, these exercises are just fun from time to time!

Hardware Design

My prototype’s hardware design is targeted to using an Arduino Uno (rev 3) and a PIC16F57. Assuming the protocol looks the same for other ICSP devices, a more reusable platform could emerge from a common connector interface. Likewise, for other one-offs it could easily be adapted for different pinouts. Today, however, I just have the direct design for interfacing these two devices:

Overall, the design can’t get much simpler. For power I have two voltage sources. The Arduino is USB-powered and the 5V output powers the PIC chip. Similarly, I have a separate +12V source for entering/exiting PIC programming mode. For communication, I have tied the serial communication pins from the Arduino directly to the PIC device.

The most complicated portion of this design is the transistor configuration; though even this is straightforward. I use the transistor to switch the 12V supply to the PIC chip. If I drive the Arduino pin 13 high, the 12V source shunts to ground. Otherwise, 12V is supplied to the MCLR pin on the PIC chip. I make no claims that this is the most efficient design (either via layout or power consumption), but it’s my first working prototype.

Serial Communication with an Arduino

Arduino has made serial communication pretty trivial. The only problem is that the Arduino’s serial communication ports are UART. That is to say, the serial communication is asynchronous. The specification for programming a PIC chip with ICSP clearly states a need for a highly controlled clock for synchronous serial communication. This means that the Arduino’s Serial interface won’t work for us. As a result, we will go on to use the Arduino to generate our own serial clock and also signal the data bits accordingly.

Setting the Clock Speed

The first task to managing our own serial communication with the Arduino is to select an appropriate clock speed. The key to choosing this speed was finding a suitable trade-off between programming speed (i.e. fast baud rate) vs. computation speed on the Arduino (i.e. cycles of computation between each clock tick).

Remember, the Arduino is ultimately running an infinite loop and isn’t actually doing any parallel computation. This means that the amount of time it takes to perform all of your logic for switching data bits must be negligible between clock ticks. If your computation time is longer than or close to the clock ticking frequency, the computation will actually impact the clock’s ability to tick steadily. As a rule of thumb, you can always set your clock rate to have a period that is roughly 1 to 2 orders of magnitude than your total computation.

Taking these factors into account, I chose 9600 baud (or a clock at 9.6KHz). To perform all the logic required for sending the appropriate programming data bits, I estimated somewhere in the 100’s of nanoseconds to 1’s of microseconds for computation. Giving myself some headroom, I selected a standard baud rate that was roughly two orders of magnitude larger than my computation estimate. Namely, a period of 104 microseconds corresponds to a 9.6KHz clock.

After completing the project I could have optimized my clock speed. However, that was unnecessary for this project. The clock rate I had selected worked well. The 9600 baud rate is fast enough for timely programming the device because we don’t have much data to transmit. Similarly, it provides us a lot of headroom to experiment with different types of computation.

Generating the Clock Signal

While this discussion has primarily focused on the design decisions involved in choosing a clock signal rate, how did we generate it? The process really comes down to toggling a GPIO pin on the Arduino. In our specific implementation, I chose pin 2 on the Arduino. While you can refer to the code for more specific details, an outline of this process follows:

Источник

magedrifaat/Arduino-PIC-programmer

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README.md

This projects enables programming PIC devices using Arduino only i.e. it should (in ideal cases) replace pickit and other programming devices. It currently only supports a very small number of devices which are PIC16F87XA family and uses Low voltage programming mode for obvious reasons. It should be able to work with some other devices as well but that is not guaranteed. Also, this only supports HEX files of Intel HEX format (which is the most common format, I believe).

Support for more devices should be added in the next updates.

All you need to start using this project is:

  • An Arduino uno (or any other Arduino but probably with a little modification to the pin numbers in the sketch).
  • The Arduino IDE.
  • And any python environment.

After you have installed the Arduino IDE and any python environment you need to install pyserial library in your python environment. It is usually done by typing this command in your console:

But it might not be that simple depending on your environment so if it didn’t work just search how to install a library in your environment.

Next thing is you get the sketch file and the hextoserial.py file from this project, upload the sketch to the arduino using the IDE, connect the Arduino to the PIC as described in the beginning of the sketch.

Having connected the arduino to the PIC as described in the sketch, and the arduino connected to your computer using USB, find out which port is your arduino connected to on your computer. This can be seen from the arduino IDE by opening port under Tools menu, You should find the port name (In windows, It is typically COMX where X is the port number), Remember that port name for the next step.

Now run hextoserial.py in your environment. You will be asked for the name of the port where the arduino is connected. After entering it you will be asked to enter the full path of the hex file. Then it asks you to enter P for programming, V for verification or D for verification with debugging, You should start by Entering P then after the programming is done enter V.

If the programming was done correctly the verification process shouldn’t produce any error messages and end with «Verification done», otherwise you will get an error message saying verification failed. You may then try reprogramming by entering P or verify with debugging using D to show you the difference between the file and the data it reads from the chip.

After you are done stop the process in the console, this should close the serial communication with the arduino and close the hex file.

Here is a circuit diagram of the connection:

Make sure you put a 10K resistor on the MCLR pin and a 100nF capacitor to the ground as shown above.

Connecting the arduino to the computer and uploading the sketch, then running the python file:

Entering the communication port and the path to the hex file:

Choosing P to program then V to verify programming:

And that’s it. Now connect the pic in its normal connection or if it is on a board remove the connections to the arduino and restart.

Источник

Arduino программатор PIC-ов.

Иногда встречаются очень интересные проекты выполненные на микросхемах PIC. Это микроконтроллеры с RISC архитектурой,
производимые фирмой Microchip Technology. Программаторы для PIC сложные и дорогие. Чтобы сделать программатор для PIC, нужен программатор для PIC, замкнутый круг для самодельщина. Но у нас есть Arduina! Сделаем из ардуины очень дешевый, очень простой, но работающий как очень дорогие HVSP программаторы микроконтроллеров от Microchip Technology.

HVSP — это High Voltage Serial Programming, высоковольтное последовательное программирование. Высоковольтное программирование позволяет сделать рабочим окирпиченный PIC контроллер из за неправильно выставленных фьюзов или заблокированных ног используемых при низковольтном программировании. В общем без разницы в каком состоянии Вам пришлют хитрые китайцы микроконтроллер, главное, чтобы он был аппаратно живой. А разлочить можно и ардуиной. Запрограммировать можно и ардуиной.

Сборка на макетной плате.

Настройка Step-UP DC-DC

Пример работы программатора сделанного из ардуино нано в макете с парой дополнительных деталей которые можно выдрать из старой техники. Единственное для удобства я использовал повышающий преобразователь для получения 13V нужных для высоковольтного программирования. Удобство заключается в том, что просто вставляете программатор в USB и работаете не заморачиваясь на необходимости подачи внешнего питания. Иначе просто можно подать это напряжение от внешнего блока питания и схема станет еще проще.


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Комментарии

nobilia7

Вложения

nobilia7

Eig
Вот о этом я Вам и толкую. На самом деле хекс, записанный в чип рабочий. В этом наверняка можно убедиться, впаяв его в соответствующее железо. Но!! если Вы сохраняете СЧИТАННЫЙ хекс для последующей работы (архив и пр.) , то здесь Вас ждет Засада. Файл считан и сохранен неправильно!
В принципе, если в редакторе Вы удалите первые 3 символа и пересохранитесь, то получите рабочую прошивку. Но это садомазохизм. И известен только Вам. . Это — то, что сохранила программа. А это Ваш Оригинал:.

На это «безобразие» Автор ответил следующее:
«. Es sieht so aus, als ob die Datei eine UTF-8-Byte-Ordnungsmarke enthält. Ich weiß nicht, wie das passiert ist, es sei denn, es wurde von der C ++ — Bibliothek ausgeführt, als Sie das Host-Programm erstellt haben. Sie können versuchen, das zweite Argument in die fopen () -Aufrufe von «w» in «wb» zu ändern, damit der Textmodus nicht verwendet wird. »
В принципе. вот только у меня нет компилятора.
Да, должно сохраняться в Интел.

@nobilia7, Вот тут
разработчик утверждает, что этот баг пофиксил. «Last change: 01/11/2014 : fixed bugs in Intel hex file export (checksum calculation, format for EEPROM data)».
Вот тут скомпилированная версия файла от 2016 года.

@nobilia7, ну понятно. Видимо, он недофиксил.
В принципе, у меня на работе Win10, 15-ая студия и 17-ая студии стоят. Попробую через какое-то время сделать то, что он рекомендует. Дома искать образ старой студии и устанавливать запаришься. Я только не уверен, что у меня компонент VB там установлен.

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